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Jigsaw 11-16 Frequently Asked Questions

for Secondary Headteachers, Leaders, Teachers and Students

FAQ's for Headteachers and Senior Leaders

Ofsted has stated that schools and colleges should be safe environments where students can learn. Put simply, Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps to teach students about keeping themselves safe both physically and emotionally, including when using technology. All the way through the Jigsaw Programme, students are taught in age- and stage-appropriate ways, about what to say and do if they don’t feel safe in a situation, or if something feels uncomfortable or not right to them, from bullying and unwanted physical contact to racism and being safe with technology. The emphasis is on helping students realise their independence and be responsible for themselves whilst knowing how and where to access advice and support when they need it.

The Jigsaw 11-16 materials have been mapped to the latest Ofsted requirements and this can be seen on the Community area of the website (for schools that have bought the Jigsaw 11-16 programme only).

Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, makes a significant contribution towards ensuring that the curriculum and the learning environment that students experience lays down a grounding in which the ideological and emotional roots of extremist beliefs, attitudes and behaviours cannot flourish. This contribution emerges first and foremost through the underpinning philosophy of the Jigsaw Programme and the learning styles it advocates, but also through many aspects of the specific content of the themes or ‘Puzzles’ that make up the Programme.

Students are taught and empowered to know their own minds, to operate from a position of self-awareness, mindfulness and self-valuing, and to develop the capacity to empathise with others as well as to think with discernment.

Jigsaw ensures all strands of the British Values agenda are given coverage throughout the Programme. They have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of British values: democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, mutual respect and tolerance of others.

These are perhaps most explicitly seen in the ‘Celebrating Difference’ and ‘Dreams and Goals’ Puzzles (units).

Jigsaw supports schools in their duty to provide:

  • A broad and balanced curriculum
  • Opportunities for SMSC
  • Support for student well-being

Furthermore, Jigsaw provides explicit teaching, supporting the ‘Behaviour and Attitudes’ and ‘Personal Development’ strands of the Ofsted framework, in addition to discrete teaching on diversity, which supports the ‘Equalities’ duty.
Mapping documents on the Community Area show in more detail how specific lessons and units serve the Ofsted framework.

Even if SMSC were not a high priority for Ofsted, we would still value these aspects of students’ development and believe that Jigsaw enhances each of them. We have mapped SMSC across each Puzzle and across each year group to ensure balanced coverage.

Every Jigsaw Piece (lesson) contributes to this target and the SMSC symbol clearly indicates which elements are enhanced in each lesson.

Employability Skills are a key feature throughout Jigsaw, sometimes explicitly described as such, sometimes more implicit in lessons. Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development, which is denoted by a CV development opportunity image.

The outcome or product from these lessons (from the students’ perspective) can be transposed to one or more of the sections of the CV template, thus providing a record of progress, as well as an opportunity to build a CV with real learning experiences.

In order for students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, it is important that they have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the CV development opportunity.

There are numerous lessons in each year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

We believe that Jigsaw 11-16 provides excellent value for money and schools already using Jigsaw 11-16 as their preferred PSHE Programme emphatically tell us the Programme is amazing value for money as it provides the structure and lesson plans (with stand-alone resources built-in) for every Year Group 7-11). The one-off cost also includes a support package through the password-protected Community Area of the website, all helping short-cut teacher planning time and enable them to deliver high-quality PSHE across the school, progression built in.

In a secondary school of 948 students (the current average figure from the DfE), Jigsaw 11-16 would cost 65p per student in one year. If used over five years, this would cost 13p per student per year. In addition, the value of Jigsaw 11-16 comes from the high-quality, well-researched lessons that save teachers hundreds of hours of preparation time.

FAQ's for Subject Leaders

Jigsaw 11-16 builds on the Jigsaw 3-11 Programme, offering a holistic PSHE learning journey spanning the pupil’s school career, with a progressive, spiral curriculum that addresses real needs in a rapidly changing world.

Jigsaw pledges to always cover all aspects of PSHE required by the DfE regarding statutory status on RSE and Health Education, to position these aspects within its holistic whole-school approach to PSHE, and to contribute significantly to the 2019 Ofsted framework, especially to behaviour and Attitudes and Personal Development.

Every aspect of the PSHE Association’s programme of study (2017) is covered in Jigsaw. The mapping documents (which are in the launch pack, once you have purchased Jigsaw 11-16) state clearly how Jigsaw covers the outcomes in the Programme of Study, as well as how Jigsaw places a lot of emphasis on emotional literacy and personal development, more than is suggested in the Programme of Study.

The Jigsaw snapshot (downloadable with the Inspection materials) gives a brief overview of the content covered in Jigsaw and the documents relating to Ofsted and statutory status guidance give more detail as to Jigsaw’s coverage.

That said, we believe it is vitally important for teachers to tailor their delivery of Jigsaw 11-16 to the needs of their students and there is flexibility built into the jigsaw Programmes to allow this to happen.

Jigsaw 11-16 was co-produced with teachers and students in 30+ schools over 2 years to ensure it works for all teachers. It does not matter if they are specialists or not, as Jigsaw 11-16 has been written with the needs of non-specialists in mind.

The detailed and flexible lesson plans (including all teaching resources) can be adapted according to the structure of the timetable and also model best practice, regardless of who is teaching the lessons.

The lesson plan is a brief summary with the lesson itself being structured and delivered through a detailed Powerpoint presentation with teacher notes beneath each slide, and activities sheets included for printing when necessary. This means preparation time is kept to a minimum, allowing teachers to use their time to tailor and differentiate the lessons rather than planning them from scratch and searching for teaching resources.

We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to adapt the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the philosophy and structure of the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact.

We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme includes six units of study (Puzzles), each with six lessons (Pieces), for each year group in Years 7-10, and currently 4 units, each with 6 lessons for Year 11, to allow for the usual restricted teaching time in Year 11 due to exams.
Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students. If students require more input on a specific topic, the school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by signalling further information and, as such, each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson. Please feel free to add local websites and/or services to the slide for your school.

The issues covered in Jigsaw lessons may well lead to discussions which disclose or hint at students’ needs that should be addressed and referred into the pastoral system.

The Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.

Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:
• Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
• Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
• Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
• Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).

There are also two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:
1. Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
2. Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost

The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).

Jigsaw’s unique CV development opportunities provide an informal assessment process for tracking student progress. (see following FAQ on developing employability skills)

We believe unique to Jigsaw 11-16, there are summative attainment descriptors, Working Towards, At and Beyond the age-related expectations, for each Puzzle (unit) for each Year Group. Each descriptor has 2 aspects, a purple and a green. The purple descriptor tracks PSHE knowledge and skills focused learning. The green descriptor tracks social skills and emotional literacy development. This process begins in Year 1 (age 5) and flows through to Year 11 (age 16), with carefully thought-through progression and continuity. (Foundation Stage is aligned to the National Early Years Framework)

Teachers use student work, student self-assessment and teacher observations in lessons etc to make a ‘best-fit’ assessment of student learning and achievement for each Puzzle (unit). The separation of the purple and green descriptors provide the opportunity to offer more specific targeted support to students who need it.

We believe Jigsaw PSHE lessons are examples of good practice while enabling teaching staff to use their professional judgement and creativity to best meet the needs of students. Teachers are, of course, free to adapt the lesson plans and resources to suit students and staff, whilst maintaining the fidelity of the Jigsaw Programme.

In order for the Jigsaw Programme to have the most positive impact in school, it is important that teachers adhere to the programme. Whilst there is room for flexibility in the structure (as you will have seen in the way the lessons are planned), and it is vital to meet student needs, it is crucial that teachers use the tried-and-tested methods and ideas so they can note real impact. We have produced lesson plans that can be used in a range of settings and using a variety of teaching models to suit all needs, and carefully considered how learning happens and the structures necessary to optimise this.

School settings may find it useful and illuminative to gather feedback from students and staff on how they feel Jigsaw is working. How feedback is gained is up to your school: you might like to design a simple questionnaire (e.g. what is working well…, it would be even better if…, any other comments), which can be on paper or online using a survey generator.

Jigsaw’s unique CV development opportunities also provide an informal assessment process for tracking student progress. (see next FAQ)

Each Puzzle (unit) includes a lesson where the activities lend themselves to providing students with evidence of their personal development, which is denoted by a CV development opportunity image. The outcome or product from these lessons (from the students’ perspective) can be transposed to one or more of the sections of the CV template, thus providing a record of progress, as well as an opportunity to build a CV with real learning experiences.

In order for students to gain the most from the Jigsaw Programme, it is important that they have the chance to experience the full lesson (Learning Pod, the Big Bit, Finishing Facts and the Signpost) to make best use of the CV development opportunity.

There are numerous lessons in each year group that explore the world of work and further study, most of which appear in the Dreams & Goals and Being Me in My World Puzzles (units).

We believe mindfulness practice has significant benefits to mental health, self-esteem and the capacity to learn.
Supported by many years’ experience in teaching and psychotherapy, and through seeing the tangible positive impact this makes on children experiencing Jigsaw 3-11, the practice of mindfulness, even just a few minutes each Jigsaw lesson, can have real benefits.

Students learn to become aware of their thought processes and emotional states in the present moment without judgement, and the ability to do this needs to be practised regularly.

The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness philosophy. This aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it.

So, we believe that a few minutes mindfulness practice at the beginning of each Jigsaw lesson can have significant positive impact on learning and mental health.

The Jigsaw 11-16 programme is flexible and can be adapted easily to suit most teaching styles and PSHE curriculum arrangements. To make this as simple to adapt as possible, the Jigsaw 11-16 lesson structure is split into four parts.
Assuming a full 4-part lesson needs an hour’s teaching time:

• Learning Pod, where students focus on the essence of the lesson (approx. 15-20 minutes);
• Big Bit, which builds upon and develops that which is in the Learning Pod (approx. 30-35 minutes);
• Finishing Facts (conclusion) (approx. 2-3 minutes) and
• Signpost (approx. 2 minutes).

There are two distinct lesson combinations depending on teaching time available:

1. Learning Pod + Finishing Facts + Signpost
2. Learning Pod + Big Bit + Finishing Facts + Signpost

The lessons can be taught weekly OR as the components for a drop-down/off-timetable day (Jigsaw believes PSHE is usually more effective when delivered in a regular time-tabled teaching slot so learning can be built over time).

The need to ensure progression and continuity from age 3 to 16 is paramount, as is the need for these to be easily identified by teachers to enable links to be made from year to year and from Puzzle to Puzzle. This is achieved with the veins of learning, and they are:

1. Mindfulness
The Jigsaw team is committed to using mindfulness philosophy and practice throughout its PSHE/health and well-being programmes. We understand the deep impact these can have on human beings as they address the core of emotional and mental health, enabling young people to understand themselves and how their minds work, along with techniques and skills to use into adult life to maintain balance and well-being and counteract stress and adversity. (See more below.)

2. Relationships
The relationship with self (involving self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem, the belief that “I am worthy’) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen. Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict resolution are enabled through Jigsaw 3-16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

3. Exploration
All progress involves some elements of risk and aspiration. This is healthy and needs to be understood and managed on an individual basis. These aspects are captured under ‘exploration’.
Evidence of the veins feature in every lesson and the interrelationships between the veins is clear throughout the Jigsaw Programme.

Yes, we do.

The Jigsaw Consultants are all experienced teachers and trainers and can provide in-school training on Jigsaw 11-16 resources (twilight, half day or full day sessions).

We also provide RSE training, to equip staff with the knowledge, skills and competence to deliver high-quality RSE lessons using the Jigsaw programme.

Find out about our training opportunities at www.jigsawpshe.com/training. or contact our friendly team.

There is an additional cost for in-school training.

The overall price depends on how many year groups you need to fit your school and regional structure.

For full pricing information on Jigsaw 11-16, use the Products menu at the top of the page, choose Jigsaw 11-16 and then your region.

If you have ordered the digital download, we will issue you with your login details as soon as possible. So, usually within 2 working days you will have access to the materials and can then download everything you need.

We encourage you to read through the ‘Launch Pack’ and explore the Community Area of the website before you start using any of the resources, as there is a lot of useful information available to you to help get Jigsaw 11-16 off to a positive start across your school.

If you order the printed folders in addition to the digital download, your folders will usually arrive within five working days, depending on where your school is situated.

Once you receive your resources, you will be sent several documents, which will help you set up Jigsaw 11-16 in your school and fulfil student and staff needs.

Follow the instructions in the Launch Pack and contact the Jigsaw team if you have any further questions.

FAQ's for Teachers

Our handy Snapshot document shows what is taught in each year group. It also demonstrates progression and the spiral curriculum, with concepts and topics introduced from age 11 and repeated and built upon as students progress through the year groups.

If you already have Jigsaw 11-16, the Snapshot document is included in your ‘Launch Pack’ which you can download after you log into the Jigsaw 11-16 website.

If you haven’t got Jigsaw yet, you will find the Snapshot included with our free Inspection Materials, which can request here.

Get the free Inspection Materials
The lessons in Jigsaw 11-16 are mindful of many different learning styles, so there will be plenty of opportunities for students to learn in different ways, for example, in groups, individually, in pairs, using different media, and for different purposes.

To differentiate further it is possible, because all year groups study the same Puzzle (unit) at the same time (but at their own level), to pull up onto your computer screen, the relevant lessons for that unit from different year groups and thereby select learning activities that will best suit your students’ needs/abilities.

Our 3-11 article on teaching ‘composite classes’ takes this further. The same strategies apply across all the year groups.

In Jigsaw PSHE, mindfulness is developed in two ways:

  1. Through the mindfulness practice in each Piece (lesson). This consists of breathing techniques, awareness exercises, and visualisations.
  2. Through the unfolding of mindfulness philosophy within the lessons. For example, this might be explaining how the brain works, how thought-processes happen and the potential consequences of this; it would then explain how the mind can be best used in the context of whatever PSHE content is being covered, for instance, when making decisions about relationships or using alcohol.

There is a short mindfulness practice script included with each lesson plan for the teacher to read. To make this even easier, there is also an audio file embedded into one of the early slides in every lesson’s PowerPoint presentation. We know this approach is invaluable, so we invite you to try it and encourage your students to persevere and practise this to enable the positive impact it can have.

The Community Area of the 11-16 website also has mindfulness practice videos to try if students prefer a visual focus, and supplementary videos and audio files are included in the annual update package.

We have produced a short video that explains how and why mindfulness is used in Jigsaw lessons, which you will also find in both 3-11 and 11-16 Community Areas. This is to explain to students and staff why there is mindfulness practice in Jigsaw lessons, and may be used to explain the concept to parents/carers too.

One of the six Puzzles (units) in Jigsaw 11-16 is called Relationships and is dedicated to exploring the relationships we have with ourselves and with others. One of the three veins that runs through the Jigsaw programme is about relationships.

Indeed, the relationship with self (involving self-awareness, self-identity, innate qualities and skills of resilience, self-esteem) is the vital starting point, which has an impact on everything else, from decisions regarding health to relationships chosen.

Positive and successful relationships with others stem from this starting point, including others in friendships, family, communities and as a global citizen. Skills of empathy, intimacy, communication, negotiation and conflict resolution are enabled through Jigsaw 3-16, as appropriate at different ages and stages of development.

Note that Jigsaw 11-16 fulfils the requirements for statutory Relationships, Sex and Health Education in England, 2018.

The Jigsaw Sex Education Pieces (lessons) aim to give students their entitlement to information about puberty, human reproduction, sexual health, consent and all aspects in the DfE Guidance, statutory from 2020, and as appropriate to their age and stage of development.

It is treated in a matter-of-fact manner to allay embarrassment and fear. We do not believe it is controversial. It is flexible enough for a school to ensure that the material fits their ethos and values.

There is a strong safeguarding element to this work. The materials in Jigsaw are original so all schools are advised to check them carefully to ensure they fit appropriately with the philosophy and ethos of that setting.

Schools with religious character will obviously need to check their own diocesan/organisation’s advice during this process.

Sample policy documents have been added to the Community Area of the Jigsaw website to assist schools in updating their policy in line with DfE guidance.

Note that Jigsaw 11-16 fulfils the requirements for statutory Relationships, Sex and Health Education in England, 2018.

There are myriad ways in which Jigsaw, the mindful approach to PSHE, helps students learn about, improve and sustain good mental health, and these lessons more than cover the requirements set out in the latest government guidance on teaching about mental health.

Jigsaw contains lessons explaining mental illness e.g. eating disorders/self-harm etc but chooses also to emphasise how to gain and maintain positive mental health.

For example, each lesson plan clearly states which of the five emotional literacy domains are contained so the purpose of that lesson is clear, in terms of student development and not just their ‘knowledge learning’. Confidence in oneself, awareness of self-identity and authentic self-esteem – the backbones of good mental health – are sometimes difficult for students to develop. However, a tried-and-tested method is used in Jigsaw and is proving to be invaluable when helping students to become more successful in all aspects of their lives, not just as learners.

Mindfulness philosophy and practice (through which students learn to be aware of their thoughts and feelings in the present moment  – without judgement and to direct their minds to focus on whatever they choose to focus on) is included at the start of each Jigsaw lesson and uses visualisation and breathing techniques. This philosophy is woven through many lessons to enhance student’s understanding and how it assists positively in real-life situations.

The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower students to learn now and improve their life-chances later, and to help them develop personal awareness. Mindfulness practice enables them to observe their own thoughts and feelings, regulate them safely and make conscious decisions about their learning, behaviour and lives. It helps them to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in it, allaying and managing stress and anxiety and helping grow gratitude and appreciation, a positive psychology towards life.

The latest guidance recommends that schools need to teach social and emotional skills. These skills are too important to only be learned by osmosis, which is why Jigsaw 3-16 develops them in a structured and developmental way throughout every age group.

A programme like Jigsaw is so helpful to schools, because it sets out exactly how students learn best and how to teach skills that lead to better social, emotional and mental health, which in turn builds their capacity to learn.

Schools can be confident that a focus on well-being and mental health not only enables them to provide healthy and happy school environments for students and staff, and prepare the citizens of tomorrow with sound character and values, but also directly supports their more immediate mission, which is shared by Jigsaw: the promotion of effective learning.

Jigsaw 11-16 resources can assist schools in their delivery of a robust and meaningful careers strategy. Indeed, the Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers. For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be achieved in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

The DfE has made use of the eight Benchmarks of good career guidance, developed by the Gatsby Charitable Foundation, to set a standard of excellence, and it is against these benchmarks that Jigsaw 11-16 is mapped.

Jigsaw integrates numerous areas for student development through the entire scheme of learning. These have been mapped across the year groups and across each of the Puzzles (units) to ensure that there is full coverage of development opportunities through the entire scheme – featuring in every Jigsaw Piece (lesson).

Elements of each Jigsaw lesson will support student development of the emotional literacy domains: self-awareness, social skills, empathy, motivation and managing their feelings.

There are numerous opportunities in Jigsaw for teaching and learning about financial capability and economic well-being. The Puzzle ‘Dreams and Goals’ holds most of the explicit lessons on finances, where it looks at enterprise and fundraising, aspirations, jobs and careers.

For all year groups, learning intentions are focused on perseverance, achieving goals and thinking about what needs to happen now so that things can be better in the future. Equally, the emphasis is on jobs and careers, and deciding on what is important in life.

No. You need to be a skilled teacher who is willing to teach PSHE so that it meets student needs.

The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers
and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and trialled in 30+ schools across the UK, Europe and the USA.

The lesson plans support both specialist and non-specialist delivery and are mindful of the time pressures under which teachers work.

FAQ's for Students

Jigsaw 11-16 is co-produced with teachers and students and it is our aim to ensure it is as relevant to young people’s real lives as possible. This is a challenge for a universal curriculum programme and we encourage teachers to use it as their underpinning structure and to add specifics relevant to their school community when necessary.

There are so many opportunities to learn useful lessons throughout the Jigsaw 11-16 programme, as well as ways to learn outside the classroom, using the included Signposting links.

Jigsaw 11-16 is a universal programme and will be relevant to most students today. If you require more input on a specific topic, your school setting will need to provide or suggest targeted support services appropriate to need. In addition to this, Jigsaw 11-16 can help by providing useful places to find more information and, as such each lesson ends with signposting: the final slide of each lesson features links to useful websites that are relevant to the messages of the lesson.

Your PSHE / Health & Well-being teacher is free to add local websites and/or services to the slide.

The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been co-developed by the Jigsaw specialist team with students, teachers and key stakeholders from young people’s services, and trialled in 30+ schools across the UK, Europe and the USA. The lessons support both specialist and non-specialist delivery and are mindful of the time pressures under which teachers work. This means it is a unique programme.

The focus on mental health is evident throughout. The Jigsaw team is passionate about mental health being a pre-requisite for successful learning, for health, happiness and positive life choices. It is also crucial for understanding that young people need to be empowered to understand themselves and their minds in order to combat stress, pressure and influences that may cause them harm.

The content is student-driven and is in line with the most recent national guidance. Jigsaw 11-16 remains a universal, core programme that will be added to and updated regularly to accommodate changing needs and contexts.
The Jigsaw 11-16 Programme has been mapped fully to the PSHE Association Programme of Study (2017) and amply covers all the expectations and outcomes, comfortably meeting the statutory requirements set out in the DfE guidance, contributing to the 2019 Ofsted framework plus much more.

Your school can provide a snapshot overview which shows what you will learn from age 11 to age 16 in the Jigsaw 11-16 programme. This Snapshot is supplied to your school in the Jigsaw Launch Pack and is also in our Inspection Materials (for schools that have not yet purchased Jigsaw 11-16).
At Jigsaw, we believe that the practice of mindfulness, where students learn to be in the present moment without judgement, needs to be taught in every Jigsaw lesson – through the mindfulness practice time, through visualisation and breathing techniques.

The Jigsaw Approach is underpinned by mindfulness and this aims to empower your learning, and improve your life-chances later, and to help you develop personal awareness.

Mindfulness practice simply enables you to observe your own thoughts and feelings, regulate them and make conscious decisions about your learning, behaviour and life. It helps you to remain focused on the present moment and thrive in that moment.